312 Comments

thank you

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Great article, Toby! And thank you for the shout out regarding my quarantine camp lawsuit victory over New York's tyrannical Governor Hochul. Keep up the great work!

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Outstanding post. Thank you.

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Oct 27, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

Yet another brilliant analysis… I was just talking about Pan to a friend last night. When I lived in California for about a decade, I realized that he was the irrational driving force who pushed hard for vaccinating all children at all and any cost. It made no health sense, but it did make Hell sense. I always wondered if he was a plant from China.

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Oct 17, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

Thank you for this article. Meet Josh Coleman--he is my hero. His son was paralyzed by the DTaP. He was a cameraman on the "Vaxxed" tour when I first learned of him; he started "V is for Vaccine" in CA, a movement which spread to NYC, Hawaii, Seattle, etc. He has followed and been Pan's nemesis for years... https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10229959996161998&set=a.3583508544365

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Garret Hardin later had to admit that his conclusion in The Tragedy of the Commons was wrong: history does not prove that people will inevitably mismanage the Commons, rather the contrary. Gardin's thesis was just a Trojan horse for more capture of public lands by private, corporate ownership in the goal so succinctly captured by the WEF slogan: "You will own nothing and be happy." And of course, pay rent for everything from land to air to your technocrat overlords. Talk to any farmer and they will tell you how stupid they'd have to be to over-exploit their land. This typically happens when farmers are taken off the land and corporate agribusiness takes over, with its sole value being maximizing profits. The same applies to forestry: the larger logging corporations have become here in Canada, the worse and more harmful their practices have become. If instead we gave life leases to smaller portions of forest to family-based operations, it would be treated as a legacy to protect and manage wisely for their descendants. Small operators have already proven it.

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Oct 11, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

Not sure where to put this, so I'll put it here: These committees can be powerful, so if any intrepid member of the good team would like to sacrifice time and effort to take a seat (and box out the bad team from that seat, at least) on a new FDA advisory committee, here's how: https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/digital-health-center-excellence/fda-digital-health-advisory-committee

"Digital health" sounds like spyware and tracking to me. Anybody with a science, technology, or healthcare background could make a case for being one of the experts. People like Toby are already "blown," but I believe there are many good people with the right background (who are not yet known to the PTB) who could be part of this.

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Oct 9, 2023·edited Oct 9, 2023

I enjoyed your article but disagree when you make a claim there are trillions of viruses, especially since no one has ever actually found a virus. Bacteria, yes, viruses, no. Scientists have been able to see and isolate exosomes in the body that may be what virologists are confusing with viruses under an electron microscope. But even then, the only way they can ever "see" a virus is after mixing fluid from a person suspected of being sick from a virus with a melange of other components like antibiotics, fetal bovine serum and including cells usually cancer cells or African green monkey cells and then starving them. Then when the cells start to break down they see some debris they say is a virus. But as far as I know, a control experiment watching the same mixture sans the fluid suspected of containing a virus produces the same cell lysis. This does not occur in the real world and in no way proves either existence of a virus.

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Oct 9, 2023·edited Oct 9, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

As someone from a fishing family, I've always had both respect for and skepticism of the "tragedy of the commons." Fishermen generally paid close attention to the health of their fishing grounds.

Dory boat fishermen and long-liners who caught their fish on hooks initially resisted and were skeptical of trawling or "dragging" technology which was introduced by the U.S. government because it would both bruise the fish and disturb the bottom which neither seine nets nor gill nets did. But ultimately, the safer and more productive dragging replaced the dorymen and long-liners.

Then "Catch-Shares" and "Days-At-Sea" schemes resulted in fishermen having to throw large portions of their hawls of dead fish overboard in the name of "stock preservation." The fishermen begged to be allowed to land the dead fish and at least let it be donated to hospitals and schools, but nope - the dead fish were required to be dumped back in the sea so the boat wouldn't exceed its daily quota. Neither would the government allow the boat quota be applied to several days. So, boats were forced to go to sea on multiple days using more fuel and assuming more risk just to throw away more dead fish each day than they landed..... which according to the US. government was to protect the fishing grounds from rapacious fishermen and the "tragedy of the Commons."

Oh yes, and not only did fishermen often have to pay for a government observer , but also the U.S. Coast Guard would board boats with guns in hand to inspect their catches.

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Brilliant article !!

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Oct 8, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

Again an exceptionally strong piece. Unfortunately I believed CDC and big pharma had our best interest at heart. Now I realize the error of my ways. Looking for a new primary physician due his brainwashing and inability to see reality!

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Oct 8, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

I’ve recently applied this logic to my pets as well. They carry diseases yea, but so do we. No more annual visits to the vet. The number of animals with allergies and cancer should be enough to wake up owners. Parents too… but clearly majority go along with the madness.

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"In an earlier era, when public health focused on large public works projects, health improved. Now that public health focuses almost exclusively on promoting vaccines, health and well-being have plummeted."

Bingo. We should be giving Nobel Peace Prizes to garbage men and sewer workers. They continue to save humanity and make life more tolerable for all of us than ANY "important" medical industrial complex worker out there.

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Toby Rogers, thank you for your discussion of the commons. It is foundational, and can be pursued more. One of them is the closure of art in all the museums to every person who can not afford it. It also limits the frequency of such visits. Thus, a fee becomes a gate, a closure of what was once a cultural commons. That cultural commons is at the heart of our civilization and thus very important. There was a time when I visited the Morgan library every day after school. Impossible now. The power of the art at the Morgan, the Met, the Frick and the Modern is only felt with continual visits. Frequency should be encouraged. The first time I visited Manhattan, all museums were free. I spent my Sundays in museums. The Cleveland Museum of Art, understands it is housing the commons, and remains free to all. It encourages frequent visits. Could it be because Cleveland's culture grew from its founding as the Western Reserve after the Shay's Rebellion?

Moisha Blechman

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Still in the control group for the 6 or so mRNA shots thus far. I’m not sure how mRNA in an airborne delivery method will survive the effects of UV light even for a short period of time.

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Oct 7, 2023Liked by Toby Rogers

One correction. Big Pharma doesn't discriminate, it gives equally to both Democrats and Republicans, just in case...

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